First celebrated in 1982, International Peace Day (September 21) is a day that provides an opportunity for all individuals, organizations and nations to create practical acts of peace. The theme for this year’s International Peace Day is“Sustainable Peace for a Sustainable Future.” In Rio+20 this past summer, world leaders made a commitment to sustainable development. Building on sustainable development is that of sustainable peace. According to a United Nation’s website, “The root causes of many conflicts are directly related to or fuelled by valuable natural resources, such as diamonds, gold, oil, timber or water. Addressing the ownership, control and management of natural resources is crucial to maintaining security and restoring the economy in post-conflict countries. Good natural resource management can play a central role in building sustainable peace in post-conflict societies.” The outcome document, The Future We Want allows individuals, organizations and groups to reflect upon how concrete actions and plans can lead us to a sustainable future. Additionally,Millennium Development goal (#7) speaksof working to ensure environmental sustainability. 

First celebrated in 1982, International Peace Day is a day that provides an opportunity for all individuals, organizations and nations to create practical acts of peace. The theme for this year’s International Day of Peace is “Sustainable Peace for a Sustainable Future.” In Rio+20 this past summer, world leaders made a commitment to sustainable development. Building on sustainable development is that of sustainable peace. According to a United Nation’s website (http://www.un.org/en/events/peaceday/), “The root causes of many conflicts are directly related to or fuelled by valuable natural resources, such as diamonds, gold, oil, timber or water. Addressing the ownership, control and management of natural resources is crucial to maintaining security and restoring the economy in post-conflict countries. Good natural resource management can play a central role in building sustainable peace in post-conflict societies.” The outcome document, The Future We Want (http://www.un.org/en/sustainablefuture/) allows individuals, organizations and groups to reflect upon how concrete actions and plans can lead us to a sustainable future. Additionally, Millennium Development Goal number seven speaks of working to ensure environmental sustainability (http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/pdf/MDG_FS_7_EN.pdf). 

First celebrated in 1982, International Peace Day is a day that provides an opportunity for all individuals, organizations and nations to create practical acts of peace. The theme for this year’s International Day of Peace is “Sustainable Peace for a Sustainable Future.” In Rio+20 this past summer, world leaders made a commitment to sustainable development. Building on sustainable development is that of sustainable peace. According to a United Nation’s website (http://www.un.org/en/events/peaceday/), “The root causes of many conflicts are directly related to or fuelled by valuable natural resources, such as diamonds, gold, oil, timber or water. Addressing the ownership, control and management of natural resources is crucial to maintaining security and restoring the economy in post-conflict countries. Good natural resource management can play a central role in building sustainable peace in post-conflict societies.” The outcome document, The Future We Want (http://www.un.org/en/sustainablefuture/) allows individuals, organizations and groups to reflect upon how concrete actions and plans can lead us to a sustainable future. Additionally, Millennium Development Goal number seven speaks of working to ensure environmental sustainability (http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/pdf/MDG_FS_7_EN.pdf). 

First celebrated in 1982, International Peace Day is a day that provides an opportunity for all individuals, organizations and nations to create practical acts of peace. The theme for this year’s International Day of Peace is “Sustainable Peace for a Sustainable Future.” In Rio+20 this past summer, world leaders made a commitment to sustainable development. Building on sustainable development is that of sustainable peace. According to a United Nation’s website (http://www.un.org/en/events/peaceday/), “The root causes of many conflicts are directly related to or fuelled by valuable natural resources, such as diamonds, gold, oil, timber or water. Addressing the ownership, control and management of natural resources is crucial to maintaining security and restoring the economy in post-conflict countries. Good natural resource management can play a central role in building sustainable peace in post-conflict societies.” The outcome document, The Future We Want (http://www.un.org/en/sustainablefuture/) allows individuals, organizations and groups to reflect upon how concrete actions and plans can lead us to a sustainable future. Additionally, Millennium Development Goal number seven speaks of working to ensure environmental sustainability (http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/pdf/MDG_FS_7_EN.pdf). 

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